Using Color to Create the Mood You Want

I’d like to welcome a Google Plus friend today and he is Jeffery Robinson. Jeffery wanted to write a post on color for everyone to read so here it is, a guest post from Jeffrey!

An elderly woman with means once was asked at a New York art show if she liked a particular expensive artist painting: “Heavens no. His work is too “dark” for my taste; he must have had a horrible childhood.” Actually colors really do reflect a person’s mood redolent of a bad day at work or getting stood up by a friend who had two tickets to a Broadway show you were dying to see. ColorWheel1Take the color green, for example. Green symbolizes nature, ergo, some people would opt to paint the inside and outside of their home green. It’s easier on the eyes so maybe it will improve your vision. And since green is Mother Nature’s favorite color, you better forget the “bad mouthing”; Mother Nature always bats last.

And for those of you who think that a color is….well, just a color, and you pick the inside and outside colors of your home using decks of Tarot cards, maybe this clue will set you straight. Generally paint colors fall into two categories: warm and cool. Warm colors can include, but not be limited to, red, yellow, and orange, ostensibly targeted at heat, anger, and passion. These warm colors can also act as an appetite trigger; Yikes. Okay, hold on folks. Let’s finish the article first before you go running out for six cans of one of those colors.

Violet, blue and green colors are considered “cool” hues that promote a restful and relaxing atmosphere. Actually one state prison in Oregon that was having a ton of fights, threats and near killings inside, took it upon themselves to paint the inside of each cell pink that produces a calming effect instead of a boring and ugly grey. In less than two weeks, anger subsided, cell mates became friendlier and moods of the inmates changed drastically.

This is a perfect example that color really can create the mood you want. From the inside or outside of your home, to the color of the car you drive. Mood ring colors can actually sense changes in a person’s body temperature, and while it’s not always going to be accurate all the time, it’s better than nothing. That said by now we believe we have proved the point using legal jargon: “beyond a reasonable doubt.” So thinking ahead, you’ll probably find this masterpiece so salient you may want to print it and keep it for future reference that colors enhance moods and actions:

1 – Yellow – hospital (Think interior colors)

2 – Green – we already touched on (Think Mother Nature)

3 – Pink – we already touched on (Think prisons)

4 – Blue – confidence (Think police)

5 – Red – passion and emotions (Think love and desire)

6 – Orange – success, happiness, energy (Not for emotional people)

7 – Purple – signifies royalty and $$$$$ (You were thinking grapes, right?)

8 – Black – power and influence (Think your boss)

9 – White – a neutral color (Think snow, innocence, purity)

Thanks Jeffrey! If you’d like to join Jeffery on Google Plus and add him to your circles you can find here here.

About Donna Frasca

www.AngelHug234.com www.DecoratingbyDonna.com
This entry was posted in Color, Guest Post. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Using Color to Create the Mood You Want

  1. Great post and guest post! I recall a study regarding the ‘pepto’ pink in prisons. In that, the pink had a limited calming affect. The inmates were initially calmed, but being in the ‘pink’ surroundings for too long had the opposite effect. (I wish I could find that to share. It was quite interesting.)

  2. Donna Frasca says:

    I think the pink in the prisons was not so much for calming (is pink really a calming color?) or just to irk the men a little with a girly color. That’s what I think.

  3. Hi Donna, thanks you like it. Hope I can do more guest post in your blog in the future. – Jeffrey

  4. Donna Frasca says:

    Sounds great Jeffrey!

  5. Pingback: Using Color to Create the Mood You Want | HomeCentrl

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